Choosing a Paint Pallette…

color |kələr| ( Brit. colour)

noun

1 the property possessed by an object of producing different sensations on the eye as a result of the way the object reflects or emits light…

 

Home Decor, Designer Tips, Style in the Home, Staging to Sell, Rosemary Joles, San Diego Homes for Sale, La Mesa Homes for Sale, HGTV, Color Part Two, Pinterest, Seeds Paint, Homelove,

How to Use Color

So now lets look at a palette from Seeds—Frozen. Notice five colors. The second from the right is the lightest. We also find a brown, which is something we might use if we are adding wood tones into the mix – floor, rug, and furniture pieces could harmonize with this tone. The far right is a soft blue-gray, perhaps a denim or a chambray might be perfect as a fabric in the space. And my other light neutral would be the far left pinkish tan.

Scenario One

This first designer went with the gray on the wall and used the lighter colors for the furnishings and rug. Looks great, doesn’t it. It works because they have lots of light and have used white on the trim and ceiling. The windows and the picture over the white mantle also have lots of white. Notice that the furnishings are the pinky tan. They brought some pop with the gray ottoman coffee table.

Home Decor, Designer Tips, Style in the Home, Staging to Sell, Rosemary Joles, San Diego Homes for Sale, La Mesa Homes for Sale, HGTV, Color Part Two, Pinterest, Seeds Paint, Homelove,

 

This designer went with the brown and used the lighter colors for the furnishings and rug. Looks great, doesn't it. It works because the have lots of light and have used white on the trim and ceiling. The windows and the picture over the white mantle also have lots of white, too. Also, notice that the furnishings are the pinky tan. They brought some pop with the gray ottoman coffee table.

Scenario Two

This next room uses the bluer tones. This room is green meaning that the materials have been reclaimed. The colors remind me of driftwood, they move visually from tone to tone, the way the wood tones vary in sun bleached wood. This gives the room a cabin feel. Absent is the formality of a standard home largely by how they use color. The designer used white to dilute the intensity of color but it works. If you notice, the flooring is ceramic tile or brick. They could add more warm tones by staining the wood in the cabinets but if you like the softness of the blue, it works.

You could add more definition to the space by introducing black or a dark charcoal. Perhaps frames, shelves, linens, and a rug with a herringbone black and white would add more visual weight. Photo Courtesy of Skonakem

You could add more definition to the space by introducing black or a dark charcoal with a great intensity. Perhaps frames, shelves, linens, and a rug with a herringbone black and white would add more visual intensity.

Scenario Three

The background tone is a middle grade version of the brown. What I love with this choice is that both white and dark pop against this background. The designers used lots of white here: the ceiling, bedding, carpet, and even the bathroom beyond lighten up the brown. Furthermore, there are two marvelous skylights which throw light on the focal point, namely the bed. Note the dark charcoal blue ottoman at the end of the bed.

In the foreground they’ve added gray in the lampshade left and sofa to the right. The ottoman incorporates more of the brown and the rug adds an intensified mauve.

In each of these spaces, the designers have allowed a greater amount of the neutral to tone down the accent color. They are each both masculine and feminine. With the exception of the rug under the bed, most of the surfaces could take some pretty good wear and tear and appear clean.

 Catch the rest of our series:  Week One: the personal nature of color. Week Two: how to choose colors that please.

 

Leave a Comment